The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

Used - Good: All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels. Shrink wrap, dust covers, or boxed set case may be missing. Item may be missing bundled media.
See more
Sold by Bay State Book Company and fulfilled by Amazon.
[{"displayPrice":"$14.49","priceAmount":14.49,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"14","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"49","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"adaydtbPXevFCgm4kjp458BARF7op5UdzIkDXRLM2dUVddoxMVLZ%2BeqbZ3MsauMxkXtG8HWxYQZNr7VobbwiCf%2FaNCLoAsqzwAgUn4%2Bucye7WzyXodOfY08DrFGAfNAan5ir7qIlP4U%3D","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"NEW"},{"displayPrice":"$6.75","priceAmount":6.75,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"6","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"75","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"lPs449CiQpxLvuHrBKrQ8YxZD5vkp6uyEk%2F7ZPemRzZA6H%2BRfWbS5nrnrsUC5s7VrZ8fVnkrgrC8O2BOSUHJiQDIYCl%2F5roiZpO2y2GM%2BIsqmbbhT5bBwGg%2BfmBnZykNWo%2FcqDaGb9xoONd3czJ%2B67%2BOmI5w6DL%2BcjR2YA8d%2B8T18zidqbGTMXH%2B1OyGTG8y","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"USED"}]
$$14.49 () Includes selected options. Includes initial monthly payment and selected options. Details
Price
Subtotal
$$14.49
Subtotal
Initial payment breakdown
Shipping cost, delivery date, and order total (including tax) shown at checkout.
ADD TO LIST
Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.
SELL ON AMAZON
Share this product with friends
Text Message
WhatsApp
Copy
press and hold to copy
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Join or create book clubs
Choose books together
Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. Explore Amazon Book Clubs
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Frequently bought together

+
+
Choose items to buy together.
Buy all three: $70.75
$14.49
$7.04
$49.22
Total price:
To see our price, add these items to your cart.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Book details

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Description

Product Description

Set in a remote fishing village in Japan, The Sound of Waves is a timeless story of first love. A young fisherman is entranced at the sight of the beautiful daughter of the wealthiest man in the village. They fall in love, but must then endure the calumny and gossip of the villagers.

From Library Journal

Written in 1956 and 1959, respectively, this duo represent a hit and a miss. LJ''s reviewer found Waves amateurish (LJ 8/56), while Temple was praised by another LJ reviewer (LJ 5/15/59) and Japanese critics, who voted it one of the ten best novels of the year.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"A story that is both happy and a work of art. . . . Altogether a joyous and lovely thing."
The New York Times "Of such classic design its action might take place at any point across a thousand years."
—San Francisco Chronicle "Mishima is like Stendhal in his precise psychological analyses, like Dostoevsky in his explorations of darkly destructive personalities."
Christian Science Monitor

From the Inside Flap

ote fishing village in Japan, The Sound of Waves is a timeless story of first love. A young fisherman is entranced at the sight of the beautiful daughter of the wealthiest man in the village. They fall in love, but must then endure the calumny and gossip of the villagers.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

UTA-JIMA—Song Island—has only about fourteen hundred inhabitants and a coastline of something under three miles.

The island has two spots with surpassingly beautiful views. One is Yashiro Shrine, which faces northwest and stands near the crest of the island. The shrine commands an uninterrupted view of the wide expanse of the Gulf of Ise, and the island lies directly in the straits connecting the gulf with the Pacific Ocean. The Chita Peninsula approaches from the north, and the Atsumi Peninsula stretches away to the northeast. To the west you can catch glimpses of the coastline between the ports of Uji-Yamada and Yokkaichi in Tsu.

By climbing the two hundred stone steps that lead up to the shrine and looking back from the spot where there is a torii guarded by a pair of stone temple-dogs, you can see how these distant shores cradle within their arms the storied Gulf of Ise, unchanged through the centuries. Once there were two "torii"; pines growing here, their branches twisted and trained into the shape of a torii, providing a curious frame for the view, but they died some years ago.

Just now the needles of the surrounding pine trees are still dull-green from winter, but already the spring seaweeds are staining the sea red near the shore. The northwest monsoon blows steadily from the direction of Tsu, making it still too cold to enjoy the view.

Yashiro Shrine is dedicated to Watatsumi-no-Mikoto, god of the sea. This is an island of fishermen and it is natural that the inhabitants should be devout worshippers of this god. They are forever praying for calm seas, and the very first thing they do upon being rescued from some peril of the sea is to make a votive offering at the sea-god''s shrine.

The shrine possesses a treasure of some sixty-six bronze mirrors. One is a grape-design mirror from the eighth century. Another is an ancient copy of a Chinese mirror of the Six Dynasties period, of which there are not more than fifteen or sixteen in all Japan; the deer and squirrels carved on its back must have emerged centuries ago from some Persian forest and journeyed halfway around the earth, across wide continents and endless seas, to come finally to rest here on Uta-jima.

The other most beautiful view on the island is from the lighthouse near the summit of Mt. Higashi, which falls in a cliff to the sea. At the foot of the cliff the current of the Irako Channel sets up an unceasing roar. On windy days these narrow straits connecting the Gulf of Ise and the Pacific are filled with whirlpools. The tip of the Atsumi Peninsula juts out from across the channel, and on its rocky and desolate shore stands the tiny, unmanned beacon of Cape Irako. Southeast from the Uta-jima lighthouse you can see the Pacific, and to the northeast, across Atsumi Bay and beyond the mountain ranges, you can sometimes see Mt. Fuji, say at dawn when the west wind is blowing strong.

When a steamship sailing to or from Nagoya or Yokkaichi passed through the Irako Channel, threading its way among the countless fishing-boats scattered the length of the channel between the gulf and the open sea, the lighthouse watchman could easily read its name through his telescope. The Tokachi-maru, a Mitsui Line freighter of nineteen hundred tons, had just come within telescopic range. The watchman could see two sailors dressed in gray work-clothes, talking and stamping their feet on the deck. Presently an English freighter, the Talisman, sailed into the channel, bound for port. The watchman saw the sailors clearly, looking very tiny as they played quoits on the deck.

The watchman turned to the desk in the watchhouse and, in a log marked "Record of Shipping Movements," entered the vessels'' names, signal marks, sailing directions, and the time. Then he tapped this information out on a telegraph key, warning cargo owners in the ports of destination to begin their preparations.

It was afternoon and the sinking sun had been cut off by Mt. Higashi, throwing the vicinity of the lighthouse into shadow. A hawk was circling in the bright sky over the sea. High in the heavens, the hawk was dipping now one wing and then the other, as though testing them, and, just when it seemed about to plummet downward, instead it suddenly slipped backward on the air, and then soared upward again on motionless wings.

After the sun had completely set, a young fisherman came hurrying up the mountain path leading from the village past the lighthouse. He was dangling a large fish in one hand.

The boy was only eighteen, having finished high school just last year. He was tall and well-built beyond his years, and only his face revealed his youthfulness. Skin can be burned no darker by the sun than his was burned. He had the well-shaped nose characteristic of the people of his island, and his lips were cracked and chapped. His dark eyes were exceedingly clear, but their clarity was not that of intellectuality‹it was a gift that the sea bestows upon those who make their livelihood upon it; as a matter of fact, he had made notably bad grades in school. He was still wearing the same clothes he fished in each day‹a pair of trousers inherited from his dead father and a cheap jumper.

The boy passed through the already deserted playground of the elementary school and climbed the hill beside the watermill. Mounting the flight of stone steps, he went on behind Yashiro Shrine. Peach blossoms were blooming in the shrine garden, dim and wrapped in twilight. From this point it was not more than a ten-minute climb on up to the lighthouse.

The path to the lighthouse was dangerously steep and winding, so much so that a person unaccustomed to it would surely have lost his footing even in the daytime. But the boy could have closed his eyes, and his feet would still have picked their way unerringly among the rocks and exposed pine roots. Even now when he was deep in his own thoughts, he did not once stumble.

A little while ago, while a few rays of daylight yet remained, the boat on which the boy worked had returned to its home port of Uta-jima. Today, as every day, the boy had gone out fishing on the Taihei-maru, a small, engine-powered boat, together with its owner and one other boy. Returning to port, they transferred their catch to the Co-operative''s boat and then pulled their own up onto the beach. Then the boy started for home, carrying the halibut he was going to take shortly to the lighthouse. As he came along the beach the twilight was still noisy with the shouts of fishermen pulling their boats up onto the sand.

There was a girl he had never seen before. She leaned resting against a stack of heavy wooden frames lying on the sand, the kind called "abacuses" because of their shape. The fishing-boats were pulled up onto the beach stern-first by means of a winch, and these frames were placed under the keels so they went sliding smoothly over one after another. Apparently the girl had just finished helping with the work of carrying these frames and had paused here to get her breath.

Her forehead was moist with sweat and her cheeks glowed. A cold west wind was blowing briskly, but the girl seemed to enjoy it, turning her work-flushed face into the wind and letting her hair stream out behind her. She was wearing a sleeveless, cotton-padded jacket, women''s work-pants gathered at the ankles, and a pair of soiled work-gloves. The healthy color of her skin was no different from that of the other island girls, but there was something refreshing about the cast of her eyes, something serene about her eyebrows. The girl''s eyes were turned intently toward the sky over the sea to the west. There a crimson spot of sun was sinking between piles of blackening clouds.

The boy could not remember ever having seen this girl before. There should not have been a single face on Uta-jima that he could not recognize. At first glance he took her for an outsider. But still, the girl''s dress was not that of outsiders. Only in the way she stood apart, gazing at the sea, did she differ from the vivacious island girls.

The boy purposely passed directly in front of the girl. In the same way that children stare at a strange object, he stopped and looked her full in the face.

The girl drew her eyebrows together slightly. But she continued staring fixedly out to sea, never turning her eyes toward the boy.

Finishing his silent scrutiny, he had gone quickly on his way. . . .

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
307 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Christopher O'Riley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Every Mishima I read becomes my new favorite.
Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2019
It''s fair to say that this past year, my reading life has been dominated by Japanese writers. I''ve been a late enthusiast of Haruki Murakami''s work, but I''ve happily read all of it in the last three years. Just before the New Year I was introduced to the work of Yasunari... See more
It''s fair to say that this past year, my reading life has been dominated by Japanese writers. I''ve been a late enthusiast of Haruki Murakami''s work, but I''ve happily read all of it in the last three years. Just before the New Year I was introduced to the work of Yasunari Kawabata through which I was swept, awe-struck through his whole ouevre. Soon after that, I read my favorite book of all time, Natsume Soseki''s I Am A Cat. Of course I read him through, though crest-fallen at the lesser prominence of felines in his later novels. Despite that, Soseki was my favorite Japanese writer, but perhaps my favorite writer of all.
Kawabata''s colleague, confidant and competitor, ultimately prevailing in his winning of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Yukio Mishima, was someone I''d heard of but never assayed.
Yukio Mishima is my favorite writer. I was fully committed to bingeing his work after my introduction via Michael Gallagher''s supremely sympathetic English translation of The Sea of Fertility''s first volume, Spring Snow. Committed as I was, I read his earliest novels, Confessions of a Mask (1949) and the formidable Forbidden Colours (1951-53). I found Alfred H. Mark''s translation of Colours irritatingly clunky in a way that made me suspect I was misapplying the abrupt and awkward prose to Mishima''s immature work. My acquaintance with Meredith Weatherby''s astonishing translation of Confessions of a Mask thoroughly disabused me of any feeling of young Mishima''s shortcomings or brashness, properly laying the blame on the lame Alfred Marks. I own the next in chronological line of Mishima''s work, Thirst For Love (1950), but, Marks having been the sole translator of that early work, I think I''ll save it for a later date.
Luckily, the inestimably talented and sympathetic translative ear of Meredith Weatherby was the English voice of The Sound of Waves (1954) which I''ve now read in a white heat. Mishima has written widely for the stage, and in this book and in the few others I''ve read, I am struck by his gifted command in shaping dramatic situations, dynamics both personal and elemental, as the ambience and engine of his narrative. I have also been overwhelmed with his imagery, wherever I''ve encountered it, with his empathetic descriptions of the sea and surf.
After the homoerotic cosmopolitan immersions of contemporary Tokyo that are Mishima''s Mask and Colours, it was bracing to say the least to find ourselves landed in the simpler setting of a humble fishing village on the small Japanese island, Uta-Jima (invoked as the first sonority, the first word of the novel)
I have always been arrested by the fierce intensity and laminate beauty of Mishima''s water imagery, but The Sound of Waves is a whole redolent universe of such astonishing evocation. It is also an unabashed, intimately compassionate and compelling love story of two children of the island, Shinji, a young apprentice fisherman, and a daughter of the diving class of island women, Hatsue. As with Confessions of a Mask, one innate talent of Mishima is in his depiction of young love, of emergent sexuality. I am confident there has never been such a master of this dynamic of innocence and awakening since Vladimir Nabokov.
As much of the novel takes place in the sea, with its dangers and daring, its implacable strength and eternity, much of the dramatic and emotional action takes place within the torii of the modest pinnacle of the island, the Yoshiro Shrine. And the true nexus of intrigue and destiny takes place at the electrical shrine dispelling darkness, danger and mystery, the lighthouse.
A writer friend of mine, someone who''d been badgering me to continue with the Three-Body Problem trilogy, when I apologized that I could not abandon my Mishima n=binge, understood, saying that it was a problematic calculus, Cixin Liu''s prophecies and epiphanies coming once every 100 pages, arriving in Mishima with every phrase.
Every characterization is true. There are no mechanistic caricatures like in a Dickens novel. Even when making right decisions, the frailty and foibles of those molding the fate of the protagonists may not state their judgements in ways that fulfill our own sense of justice and morality, but justice prevails nonetheless, and the characters and their colloquy are always true to themselves.
There are cliff-hangers in this love story, matters of bravery and menace, revelations of dark and ungenerous natures, the sanity and sanctity of suicide, morality of simple origins, intrinsic fear of modernity. The book is rich and enriching.
I feel like every Mishima book I read will become my new favorite. That''s an unfair presumption but nonetheless true with The Sound of Waves.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Thalia Johnson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The vanishing rural life
Reviewed in the United States on May 4, 2017
This is an elegiac book about 1950s rural Japan and its values and harsh life, always on the edge of poverty. The plot is simplistic only on the surface but it is at its heart, an exploration of Shintoism in the daily life of simple people. Don''t let the plot of boy meets... See more
This is an elegiac book about 1950s rural Japan and its values and harsh life, always on the edge of poverty. The plot is simplistic only on the surface but it is at its heart, an exploration of Shintoism in the daily life of simple people. Don''t let the plot of boy meets girl and undergoes a few trials before he is permitted to become engaged-it is far more complex. Read it slowly and then consider each detail. It is lyrical in its descriptions of the landscape and sea.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Chad M. Supp
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A love poem to an island.
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2016
Mishima''s love poem to an island, wrapped in a traditional story of young, forbidden love. This was my first Mishima. Like the best poets, Mishima paints vivid pictures of the natural world. The island of Uta-jima comes alive on the pages, its surrounding waters equal parts... See more
Mishima''s love poem to an island, wrapped in a traditional story of young, forbidden love. This was my first Mishima. Like the best poets, Mishima paints vivid pictures of the natural world. The island of Uta-jima comes alive on the pages, its surrounding waters equal parts beautiful and dangerous, its beaches diverse, its ecosystem unique. The love story is familiar, especially for those of us who grew up in small communities where farming and gossip are the primary local trades. For the most part, Mishima likes his characters, even the ones who clearly are not the heroes. In fact, he may like his characters a bit too much, at least in this early stage of his career, as the heroes are somewhat overloaded with virtue. It was also odd to me, that we learn so much about the breasts of the female inhabitants of Uta-jima. But I''m fond of breasts, and you could do worse than have someone of Mishima''s capabilities describe them for you.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Fredrick Vincent
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mishima was great indeed!!!
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2014
This book is about love in its purest form, but oddly enough it doesn''t hit you over the head with it: a testament to Mishima''s beautiful writing and also to the deeper meaning of the story. The main characters Shinji and Hatsue are traditional in every sense and he is... See more
This book is about love in its purest form, but oddly enough it doesn''t hit you over the head with it: a testament to Mishima''s beautiful writing and also to the deeper meaning of the story. The main characters Shinji and Hatsue are traditional in every sense and he is drawn to her at first sight, then comes a chance for them to get it on but they don''t, even though everyone thinks they did, no thanks to the antagonists Chiyoko who has been westernized along with Yasuo who tries to get it on with Hatsue in a not so traditional way. Mishima was certainly disillusioned with his changing Japan and longed for a return to its traditional roots and this book shows that, as good old tradition triumphs in the end and the antagonists come to some sort of realization of the error of their ways. And like i said, this is the beauty of Mishima''s writing, in that first and foremost this is a romance about two teenagers falling in love, but by the end you realize that it is so much more. Mishima was great indeed.
4 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Rich007
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It works
Reviewed in the United States on November 17, 2019
Have used this harness for a few years and it work as advertised. Need to clean the velcro periodically ad cat hair collects.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Mitsuko Williams
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... by a talented author Mishima who has written many best sellers, and is about a timeless theme of ...
Reviewed in the United States on September 18, 2016
This is one of the modern Japanese classics written by a talented author Mishima who has written many best sellers, and is about a timeless theme of love at first sight. The story takes place on a remote island called Utajima, and is love story between a young fisherman... See more
This is one of the modern Japanese classics written by a talented author Mishima who has written many best sellers, and is about a timeless theme of love at first sight. The story takes place on a remote island called Utajima, and is love story between a young fisherman and a daughter of a wealthy man. Through his courageous acts during a dangerous storm, he gains the approval of the villagers and the wealthy man for their relationship that was kept hidden until then. Utajima (Song Island) in the story is actually Kamishima (God''s Island), a small fishing island off the coast of Ise in south central Japan. As of 2016, though the island has a few accommodations for tourists, it remains pretty much the busy, fishing village it was when this story was written.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Alpha
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Slightly Drawn Out, but Great Overall
Reviewed in the United States on August 1, 2017
I actually was required to read this book for a summer reading project for school. I actually found this book to be enjoyable in many ways. It is a great love story that warmed and crushed my heart several times over, and it has great character development as well as very... See more
I actually was required to read this book for a summer reading project for school. I actually found this book to be enjoyable in many ways. It is a great love story that warmed and crushed my heart several times over, and it has great character development as well as very distinguishable characters. I actually found the story to be a bit drawn out at times, however, it was more than made up for with its exciting and enticing moments. I would definitely recommend this one to a casual reader, but likely not someone who is attempting to deeply analyze the books they read.
Helpful
Report
E5Tech
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read all of his work!
Reviewed in the United States on October 1, 2021
It is a good read to get lost in...
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Julian Bell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A charming love story soaked in the brine of the sea
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 21, 2017
Though this a classic coming of age / love against the odds story, it is also - perhaps more so - the story of a place. The sea and its rhythms, its beauty and its danger, its sounds and its smells, are constantly present, as is the tightly knit life of the small island on...See more
Though this a classic coming of age / love against the odds story, it is also - perhaps more so - the story of a place. The sea and its rhythms, its beauty and its danger, its sounds and its smells, are constantly present, as is the tightly knit life of the small island on which the characters live, nurturing and holding them with its traditions even as it at times threatens to stifle them. Mishima writes with elegance, clarity, delicacy and the lightest of touches, There are darker undercurrents too, though; the humiliation of Japan in the Second World War is very recent, and the whiff of frustrated desire must surely have been drawn from Mishima''s own struggle with his forbidden homosexuality.
3 people found this helpful
Report
reader 451
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sea breeze of a tale
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 26, 2015
Mishima''s best is no-doubt the sea of fertility tetralogy, but The Sound of Waves is a pleasant short novel, or long novella, less gloomy and wistfully, even uplifting, somewhat like After the Banquet but in an entirely different setting. This has Shinji, an uneducated...See more
Mishima''s best is no-doubt the sea of fertility tetralogy, but The Sound of Waves is a pleasant short novel, or long novella, less gloomy and wistfully, even uplifting, somewhat like After the Banquet but in an entirely different setting. This has Shinji, an uneducated young fisherman on an island off the coast of Japan pursue the daughter of the community headsman, the overbearing owner of several vessels. The girl, Hatsue, a former pearl diver, is well disposed, but her father is in no mood to condone anything so newfangled as a love match. Yet tradition also involves respect for courage and character, virtues in which Shinji is not lacking, and perhaps all is not as hopeless as it looked. Nor does The Sound of Waves, in spite of first appearances, present the picture of a traditional Japan stuck in its ways. On the contrary, set in the 1950s, it has its characters do such things as listen to the radio and take bus trips to Tokyo. Indeed, subtly, what Mishima brings to light is the picture of a country that is fast changing yet retaining, at least in pockets such as the island of Utajima, its traditional values. Beautifully written, this novel will serve as a good introduction to the author, or alternatively as a fine piece for anyone who has read his more major works.
Report
Kilt_monster
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Eloquent, simple, nice to read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 11, 2015
Simple, easy to read, nice plot, nice descriptions of the island where the adventure takes place and the ins and outs of day to day life. This is the tale of a young man falling in love with a rich magnates daughter. He has to overcome grand expectations, virulent rumours,...See more
Simple, easy to read, nice plot, nice descriptions of the island where the adventure takes place and the ins and outs of day to day life. This is the tale of a young man falling in love with a rich magnates daughter. He has to overcome grand expectations, virulent rumours, being outcast and his humble roots to win her hand and get off the breadline. He does so through good character, hard graft and honesty! All of this is set on a small Japanese island where thefts don''t happen, fishing and peal diving is the principle occupation and where mainland Japan seems far, far away. For characters we have an innocent girl, a strong posturing young man, a proud hawkish mother, an overbearing father and hooligan rich kid... all the people you could want for a moving plot! A few bits are a tad loose but what can I say, it is undeniably a good read.
Report
DOGG
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Small but perfectly formed...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 26, 2007
Yukio Mishima blazed a path through Japanese fiction in the fifties and sixties,just as he was reaching the peak of his powers he committed ritual suicide and the world lost a great voice from the orient... "The Sound of Waves" is set on a small island in the Gulf of...See more
Yukio Mishima blazed a path through Japanese fiction in the fifties and sixties,just as he was reaching the peak of his powers he committed ritual suicide and the world lost a great voice from the orient... "The Sound of Waves" is set on a small island in the Gulf of Ise,Eastern Japan. This short but brilliantly formed tale follows the paths of two star crossed lovers as they court each other tentatively amid the hard working lives they lead on the island. Flora,fauna,dialogue,narrative and plotlines are delicately woven around a beautiful location and an age old story. Mishima reads very well, his use of metaphor and similie is exceptionally good and i highly recommend this 1956 novel to all readers,not just fans of Japanese fiction.
Report
sugawp
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved this
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 24, 2021
As a Mishima fan I’m probably biased anyway but I loved the prose, detailed descriptions and simplicity of the story. I read it in about 2 days!
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 16 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • japanese novels
  • long beach island
  • wave sound
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale

The Sound popular of popular Waves sale