National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale


Reasons why you need this Atlas

We hope the maps in our atlas help people see and understand the world and, beyond that, spur them on to use that understanding to help make the world a better place. Maps work at the intersection of data, science, and art. They have unparalleled power to promote understanding and catalyze action, but it is people who will find solutions to the challenges we face as we strive to achieve a planet in balance and a healthy future for ourselves and the natural world.

Atlas of the World 11th Edition

National Geographic's flagship Atlas of the World, now in its 11th edition, provides maps of every country, ocean, and region of the world, as well as thematic maps and accompanying graphics showing population, environmental, and economic patterns. This atlas is a reference for schools and libraries, as well as the latest resource for home browsing and study. This volume of world maps has been completely revised and updated with visualizations of international trends and global conditions.

Looking Below the Surface

Accretion

When a heavy ocean plate bends below the edge of a continental plate or island arc, bits of sediment and melted mantle collect, or accrete, where the plates meet. Barbados accretes up to .45 mm of land each year.

Collision

Mountains often rise at the zone of impact where two continents collide. The Himalayan range formed when the Indian and Eurasian plates crashed into each other 55 million years ago, and it still grows a half inch a year.

Faulting

Stress builds when two plates move against each other. As one gives way, the resulting fault, or crack, triggers earthquakes. In Sumatra in 2004 a 1,450 kilometer-long fault unleashed a deadly magnitude 9.1 earthquake and tsunami.

Spreading

New ocean crust is born where tectonic plates spread apart, allowing lava to flow out between them. Along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the North American and Eurasian plates are moving apart about an inch a year.

Shifting Weather Patterns


Tracking Storms

Atlantic and eastern Pacific hurricanes and their counterparts—typhoons in the western Pacific and cyclones in the Indian Ocean usually draw energy from warm tropical waters, forming primarily near the Equator in regions with prevailing easterly winds. If a storm tracks toward the poles, it becomes extratropical but can still retain hurricane-force winds of 120–240 kilometers an hour. These storms shift heat and moisture away from the Equator, and the resulting wind and rain may cost thousands of human lives and billions in property damage.


Lightning Strikes

Thunderclouds produce lightning when frozen raindrops collide and create electrical charges. As positive and negative charges separate and connect, lightning appears and is often drawn to positive charges on the ground. Places where the climate is warm and conducive to thunderstorms experience the most lightning strikes. Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela sometimes sees thousands of lightning strikes per hour. India’s Brahmaputra Valley and the mountains of the Democratic Republic of the Congo are also among the world’s most lightning-prone places.


Extreme Weather

Extreme weather includes hurricanes, droughts, heat waves, tornadoes, and other deadly events. Scientists have tracked a significant increase in catastrophic weather of all kinds in the 21st century, with vulnerable islands and coastal areas suffering most. From 1997 to 2016, the nations most affected by extreme weather were in the developing world, including Honduras, Haiti, and Myanmar. Climate change contributes to extreme weather by lengthening droughts and increasing the intensity of hurricanes.

Our Watery World

Calculating Ocean Health

Data from 220 countries and territories are analyzed each year to measure the overall health of the oceans, including ecological, economic, and political factors. In 2017 the global score remained steady at 70 out of 100, but many areas, especially near the coasts of poorer African nations, achieved scores of less than 50. Tourism and the production of food and natural products, including seashells and sponges, earned the lowest scores for long-term sustainability.

Sustaining Seafood Harvests

Sustainability of world seafood harvests in 2017 was low, with wild-caught seafood scoring 51 of 100 points and ocean-farmed scoring only 28. Overfishing to the point where populations of fish are not able to recover is a problem that can be solved politically and economically. Decreasing pollution and eliminating techniques that destroy habitat or have high levels of bycatch—animals caught unintentionally—can improve marine ecosystems and help feed the world’s billions.

Fishing Activity

The global pattern, or footprint, of fishing boats documented in data from Global Fishing Watch reveals that fish harvesting takes place in at least 55 percent of ocean waters and covers four times as much of the planet as agriculture. With a billion people dependent on fish as their primary source of protein, overfishing is a growing threat, especially in Asia. But regions with a light fishing footprint offer hope as conservation zones where fish populations can regenerate.

Age of the Seafloor

One large ocean, Panthalassa, and a smaller ocean inlet, Tethys, surrounded supercontinent Pangaea until 200 million years ago, when Earth’s crustal plates shifted and split Pangaea. Today moving plates create new seafloor along boundaries (lightest red areas below). As plates move apart magma rises from inside Earth and fills the gap. Older ocean crust sinks beneath dense continental crust on either side of the Atlantic and in the western Pacific. The oldest seafloor is a remnant of Tethys in the Mediterranean Sea.

Description

Product Description

Created for all global citizens, this universally respected volume of world maps has been completely revised and updated with fascinating visualizations of international trends and global conditions.

National Geographic''s flagship Atlas of the World, now in its 11th edition, provides authoritative maps of every country, ocean, and region of the world, as well as thematic maps and accompanying graphics showing important population, environmental, and economic patterns. Organized by continent and reflecting today''s political boundaries and identities, this authoritative atlas is an indispensable reference for schools and libraries, as well as the latest resource for home browsing and study. A thematically organized opening section uses current data to visualize urgent concerns, such as Earth''s last wild places, changing freshwater availability, human migration and refugee movement, and human rights conditions globally. The back of the book contains basic facts and flags of every country, as well as a comprehensive index cross-referencing more than 150,000 place names. A thought-provoking foreword by Alexander M. Tait, The Geographer of National Geographic, begins the book.

Review

“If you’re going to buy just one atlas this fall, make it the 11th edition of the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ATLAS OF THE WORLD (National Geographic, $215), a 7.8-pound behemoth that’s a foot and a half long and a foot wide. Its mammoth size allows you to appreciate the details in its dozens of maps — satellite maps, cultural maps and physical maps, all of them striking. The best one, “Life on a Warming Planet,” lays out where temperatures are rising (and by how much), where permafrost is melting, what nations emit the most carbon dioxide and which large cities are at high risk.” – The New York TImes

About the Author

With more than a century of mapmaking experience, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC continues to be one of the world''s preeminent cartographic publishers. The new 11th edition atlas is produced by a deeply experienced editorial and cartographic team, in collaboration with preeminent scientists, scholars, and researchers, continuing a legacy of publishing quality atlas products that combine the art and science of mapmaking.

ALEXANDER M. TAIT, M.Sc., is The Geographer at the National Geographic Society. He heads National Geographic''s Map Policy Committee, leads mapping initiatives for Nat Geo Labs, and provides mapping and geography expertise for programs and media throughout National Geographic. He has worked as a cartographer at the Washington Post, a lecturer at the University of Maryland, and adviser to legal teams on the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Product information

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale

National Geographic Atlas lowest of the World, 11th outlet sale Edition online sale