Dark wholesale high quality Disciple: Star Wars online sale

Dark wholesale high quality Disciple: Star Wars online sale

Dark wholesale high quality Disciple: Star Wars online sale
Dark wholesale high quality Disciple: Star Wars online sale__below

Description

Product Description

Based on unproduced episodes of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, this new novel features Asajj Ventress, former Sith apprentice turned bounty hunter and one of the great antiheroes in the Star Wars galaxy.
 
The only way to bring down the Sith’s most dangerous warrior may be to join forces with the dark side.

In the war for control of the galaxy between the armies of the dark side and the Republic, former Jedi Master turned ruthless Sith Lord Count Dooku has grown ever more brutal in his tactics. Despite the powers of the Jedi and the military prowess of their clone army, the sheer number of fatalities is taking a terrible toll. And when Dooku orders the massacre of a flotilla of helpless refugees, the Jedi Council feels it has no choice but to take drastic action: targeting the man responsible for so many war atrocities, Count Dooku himself.
 
But the ever-elusive Dooku is dangerous prey for even the most skilled hunter. So the Council makes the bold decision to bring both sides of the Force’s power to bear—pairing brash Jedi Knight Quinlan Vos with infamous one-time Sith acolyte Asajj Ventress. Though Jedi distrust for the cunning killer who once served at Dooku’s side still runs deep, Ventress’s hatred for her former master runs deeper. She’s more than willing to lend her copious talents as a bounty hunter—and assassin—to Vos’s quest.
 
Together, Ventress and Vos are the best hope for eliminating Dooku—as long as the emerging feelings between them don’t compromise their mission. But Ventress is determined to have her retribution and at last let go of her dark Sith past. Balancing the complicated emotions she feels for Vos with the fury of her warrior’s spirit, she resolves to claim victory on all fronts—a vow that will be mercilessly tested by her deadly enemy . . . and her own doubt.

Praise for Dark Disciple
 
“Reading Dark Disciple really feels like you’re watching some of the best episodes of The Clone Wars.” EUCantina
 
“Emotionally charged . . . Christie Golden does a wonderful job of capturing the characters.” —Roqoo Depot
 
“A cool inclusion into the Star Wars mythos . . . Ventress and Vos have a cool and compelling dynamic, and are used to explore more of what it means to flirt with the Dark Side of the Force.” IGN
 
“[The Clone Wars have been] a huge part of the Star Wars brand for years, and [Christie] Golden manages to craft a story worthy of the themes and characters that fans have come to relate to. . . . [She] uses this opportunity to craft Dark Disciple into a spy/espionage thriller.” Tech Times
 
“Golden especially excelled at bringing Ventress’s biting but appealing personality to life. . . . She’s very much a woman trying to find her way, and Dark Disciple adds nuance.” Nerdist
 
Smart, captivating, and unforgettable . . . among the finest in Star Wars storytelling.” Coffee with Kenobi

Review

“Reading Dark Disciple really feels like you’re watching some of the best episodes of The Clone Wars.” EUCantina
 
“Emotionally charged . . . Christie Golden does a wonderful job of capturing the characters.” —Roqoo Depot
 
“A cool inclusion into the Star Wars mythos . . . Ventress and Vos have a cool and compelling dynamic, and are used to explore more of what it means to flirt with the Dark Side of the Force.” IGN
 
“[The Clone Wars have been] a huge part of the Star Wars brand for years, and [Christie] Golden manages to craft a story worthy of the themes and characters that fans have come to relate to. . . . [She] uses this opportunity to craft Dark Disciple into a spy/espionage thriller.” Tech Times
 
“Golden especially excelled at bringing Ventress’s biting but appealing personality to life. . . . She’s very much a woman trying to find her way, and Dark Disciple adds nuance.” Nerdist
 
Smart, captivating, and unforgettable . . . among the finest in Star Wars storytelling.” Coffee with Kenobi

About the Author

Christie Golden is the New York Times bestselling author of more than thirty novels, including Star Wars: Dark Disciple and the Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi novels Omen, Allies, and Ascension. Her media tie-in works include launching the Ravenloft line in 1991 with Vampire of the Mists, Fable: Edge of the World, more than a dozen Star Trek novels, and multiple World of Warcraft and StarCraft novels, including World of Warcraft: Thrall: Twilight of the Aspects and StarCraft II: Devils’ Due.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

Ashu-­Nyamal, Firstborn of Ashu, child of the planet Mahranee, huddled with her family in the hold of a Republic frigate. Nya and the other refugees of Mahranee braced themselves against the repercussions from the battle raging outside. Sharp, tufted Mahran ears caught the sounds of orders, uttered and answered by clones, the same voice issuing from different throats; keen noses scented faint whiffs of fear from the speakers.

The frigate rocked from yet another blast. Some of the pups whimpered, but the adults projected calm. Rakshu cradled Nya’s two younger siblings. Their little ears were flat against their skulls, and they shivered in terror against their mother’s warm, lithe body, but their blue muzzles were tightly closed. No whimpers for them; a proud line, was Ashu. It had given the Mahran many fine warriors and wise statesmen. Nya’s sister Teegu, Secondborn of Ashu, had a gift for soothing any squabble, and Kamu, the youngest, was on his way to becoming a great artist.

Or had been, until the Separatists had blasted Mah­ranee’s capital city to rubble.

The Jedi had come, in answer to the distress call, as the Mahran knew they would. But they had come too late. Angry at the Mahranee government’s refusal to cooperate, the Separatists had decided that genocide, or as close a facsimile as possible, would solve the problem of obtaining a world so rich in resources.

Nya clenched her fists. If only she had a blaster! She was an excellent shot. If any of the enemy attempted to board the ship, she could be of use to the brave clones now risking their lives to protect the refugees. Better yet, Nya wished she could stab one of the Separatist scum with her stinger, even though it would—­

Another blast, this one worse. The lights flickered off, replaced almost instantly by the blood-­red hue of the backup lighting. The dark-­gray metal of the bulkheads seemed to close in ominously. Something snapped inside Nya. Before she really knew what she was doing, she had leapt to her feet and bounded across the hold to the rectangular door.

“Nya!” Rakshu’s voice was strained. “We were told to stay here!”

Nya whirled, her eyes flashing. “I am walking the warrior path, Mother! I can’t just sit here doing nothing. I have to try to help!”

“You will only be in the . . .” Rakshu’s voice trailed off as Nya held her gaze. Tears slipped silently down Rakshu’s muzzle, glittering in the crimson light. The Mahran were no telepaths, but even so, Nya knew her mother could read her thoughts.

I can do no harm. We are lost already.

Rakshu knew it, too. She nodded, then said, her voice swelling with pride in her eldest, “Stab well.”

Nya swallowed hard at the blunt blessing. The stinger was the birthright of the Mahran—­and, if used, their death warrant. The venom that would drop a foe in his tracks would also travel to his slayer’s heart. The two enemies always died together. The words were said to one who was not expected to return alive.

“Good-­bye, Mama,” Nya whispered, too softly for her mother to hear. She slammed a palm against the button and the door opened. Without pausing she raced down the corridor, her path outlined by a strip of emergency lighting; she skidded to a halt when the hallway branched into two separate directions, picked one, and ran headlong into one of the clones.

“Whoa, there!” he said, not unkindly. “You’re not supposed to be here, little one.”

“I will not die huddled in fear!” Nya snapped.

“You’re not going to,” the clone said, attempting to be reassuring. “We’ve outrun puddle-­jumpers like these before. Just get back to the holding area and stay out of our way. We’ve got this in hand.”

Nya smelled the change in his sweat. He was lying. For a moment, she spared compassion for him. What had his life been like when he was a youngling? There had been no one to give him hugs or tell stories, no loving parental hands to soothe childhood’s nightmares. Only brothers, identical in every way, who had been raised as clinically as he.

Brothers, and duty, and death.

Feeling strangely older than the clone, and grateful for her own unique life that was about to end, Nya smiled, shook her head, and darted past him.

He did not give chase.

The corridor ended in a door. Nya punched the button. The door slid open onto the cockpit. And she gasped.

She had never been in space before, so she was unprepared for the sight the five-­section viewport presented. Bright flashes and streaks of laserfire dueled against an incongruously peaceful-­looking starfield. Nya wasn’t sufficiently knowledgeable to be able to distinguish one ship from another—­except for her own planet’s vessels, looking old and small and desperate as they tried to flee with their precious cargo of families just like her own.

A clone and the Jedi general, the squat, reptilian Aleena who had led the mission to rescue Nya’s people, occupied the cockpit’s two chairs. With no warning, another blast rocked the ship. Nya went sprawling into the back of the clone’s chair, causing him to lurch forward. He turned to her, his eyes dark with anger, and snapped, “Get off this—­”

“General Chubor,” came a smooth voice.

Nya’s fur lifted. She whirled, snarling silently. Oh, she knew that voice. The Mahran had heard it uttering all sorts of pretty lies and promises that were never intended to be kept. She wondered if there was anyone left in the galaxy who didn’t recognize the silky tones of Count Dooku.

He appeared on a small screen near the top of the main viewport. A satisfied, cruel smirk twisted Dooku’s patrician features.

“I’m surprised you contacted me,” his image continued. “As I recall, Jedi prefer to be regarded as the strong, silent type.”

The clone lifted a finger to his lips, but the warning was unnecessary. Nya’s sharp teeth were clenched, her fur bristled, and her entire being was focused on the count’s loathed face, but she knew better than to speak.

General Chubor, sitting beside the clone in the pilot’s chair, so short that his feet did not reach the floor, likewise was not baited. “You’ve got your victory, Dooku.” His slightly nasal, high-­pitched voice was heavy with sorrow. “The planet is yours . . . let us have the people. We have entire families aboard, many of whom are injured. They’re innocents!”

Dooku chuckled, as if Chubor had said something dreadfully amusing over a nice hot cup of tea. “My dear General Chubor. You should know by now that in a war, there is no such thing as an innocent.”

“Count, I repeat, our passengers are civilian families,” General Chubor continued with a calmness at which Nya could only marvel. “Half of the refugees are younglings. Permit them, at least, to—­”

“Younglings whose parents, unwisely, chose to ally with the Republic.” Gone was Dooku’s civilized purr. His gaze settled on Nya. She didn’t flinch from his scrutiny, but she couldn’t stifle a soft growl. He looked her up and down, then dismissed her as of no further interest. “I’ve been monitoring your transmissions, General, and I know that this little chat is being sent to the Jedi Council. So let me make one thing perfectly clear.”

Dooku’s voice was now hard and flat, as cold and pitiless as the ice of Mahranee’s polar caps.

“As long as the Republic resists me, ‘innocents’ will continue to die. Every death in this war lies firmly at the feet of the Jedi. And now . .  . it is time for you and your passengers to join the ranks of the fallen.”

One of the largest Mahranee ships bloomed silently into a flower of yellow and red that disintegrated into pieces of rubble.

Nya didn’t know she had screamed until she realized her throat was raw. Chubor whirled in his chair.

His large-­eyed gaze locked with hers.

The last thing Ashu-­Nyamal, Firstborn of Ashu, would ever see was the shattered expression of despair in the Jedi’s eyes.

***

The bleakest part about being a Jedi, thought Master Obi-­Wan Kenobi, is when we fail.

He had borne witness to scenes like the one unfolding before the Jedi Council far too many times to count, and yet the pain didn’t lessen. He hoped it never would.

The terrified final moments of thousands of lives played out before them, then the grim holographic recording flickered and vanished. For a moment, there was a heavy silence.

The Jedi cultivated a practice of nonattachment, which had always served them well. Few understood, though, that while specific, individual bonds such as romantic love or family were forbidden, the Jedi were not ashamed of compassion. All lives were precious, and when so many were lost in such a way, the Jedi felt the pain of it in the Force as well as in their own hearts.

At last, Master Yoda, the diminutive but extraordinarily powerful head of the Jedi Council, sighed deeply. “Grieved are we all, to see so many suffer,” he said. “Courage, the youngling had, at the end. Forgotten, she and her people will not be.”

“I hope her bravery brought her comfort,” Kenobi said. “The Mahran prize it. She and the others are one with the Force now. But I have no more earnest wish than that this tragedy be the last the war demands.”

“As do all of us, Master Kenobi,” said Master Mace Windu. “But I don’t think that wish is coming true anytime soon.”

“Did any ships make it out with their passengers?” Anakin Skywalker asked. Kenobi had asked the younger man, still only a Jedi Knight, to accompany him to this gathering, and Anakin stood behind Kenobi’s chair.

“Reported in, no one has,” Yoda said quietly. “But hope, always, there is.”

“With respect, Master Yoda,” Anakin said, “the Mahran needed more than our hope. They needed our help, and what we were able to give them wasn’t enough.”

“And unfortunately, they are not the only ones we’ve been forced to give short shrift,” Windu said.

“For almost three standard years, this war has raged,” said Plo Koon, the Kel Dor member of the Council. His voice was muffled due to the mask he wore over his mouth and nose, a requirement for his species in this atmosphere. “We can barely even count the numbers of the fallen. But this—­” He shook his head.

“All directly because of one man’s ambition and evil,” said Windu.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Darth DragonettiTop Contributor: Star Wars
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exciting, Character-Driven Reading
Reviewed in the United States on April 10, 2019
Star Wars: Dark Disciple is a 2015 publication, authored by Christie Golden. It is based on several unproduced episodes of The Clone Wars, which were written by Katie Lucas. You don''t need to have seen any of The Clone Wars to read Dark Disciple, but it does help.... See more
Star Wars: Dark Disciple is a 2015 publication, authored by Christie Golden. It is based on several unproduced episodes of The Clone Wars, which were written by Katie Lucas. You don''t need to have seen any of The Clone Wars to read Dark Disciple, but it does help.

In an uncharacteristic move by the Jedi, the Council has decided that evil former Jedi Count Dooku must be assassinated. The Clone Wars have drug on for too long, resulting in widespread death and destruction across the galaxy. But whom to carry out this bold task? The Jedi, with some trepidation, pick Quinlan Vos and a most unlikely partner: fallen Jedi Asajj Ventress. The Council''s reasoning is that both sides of the force might be best effective in combating Dooku, who is extremely powerful. Will the unlikely duo be able to stop the dastardly Dooku once and for all?

The first thing that becomes apparent when reading Dark Disciple is how faithful it is to the Clone Wars tv show. If you come to the book thinking you''ll be getting a long episode of the Clone Wars, you''d be exactly right. Dialogue, mood, plotting, and action all feels drawn right out of the television show. As I was reading, I imagined I was watching the show, and it was delightful.

Dark Disciple is well written, with exciting action and a fair amount of depth. It has all the requisite speeder chases and lightsaber duels that you would expect out of a Star Wars novel. However, while the book is often fun and light-hearted, it does veer into some very dark territory, exploring pain, despair and loss. It also serves to expand some of the mythos surrounding the Nightsisters and Count Dooku.

Where Dark Disciple really shines is in its characterization. Quinlan Vos and Asajj Ventress were two characters in the show who very much cried out for more development, but it feels like we never got enough time with either of them. Author Christie Golden paints compelling and deep portraits of both these characters. A lot of time and care is also spent on the relationship between the two protagonists, and how their time together changes them. Ultimately, it is this dynamic that drives the novel. Count Dooku is also given a nice treatment, and is made into even more of a monster than on the show. The book makes use of many popular characters from the tv show, and it is nice to have them all along for the ride.

*CAUTION: Righteous Star Wars rant ahead. Read at your own risk!*

While I did enjoy Dark Disciple, I find it follows the sophomoric trends of many of the new canon novels. I am an unabashed fan of the Legends novels, and find them to be much more mature and serious than the new stuff. I am sick of almost every new SW book reading like a young adult novel. Come on, Disney! Not sure how much longer I''ll keep giving you my money.

*Rant Complete*

Despite some of my above thoughts, I found Dark Disciple to be good reading, with much to enjoy. If you are a fan of The Clone Wars, Dark Disciple is a no-brainer pick, and you won''t be disappointed. Maybe with Disney returning to The Clone Wars, we''ll get to see Dark Disciple come to life on the small screen.
28 people found this helpful
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AdmiraluTop Contributor: Star Wars
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One Hell of a Book that Does Justice to Asajj Ventress
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2018
Wow, what a ride. What a wonderfully, complex individual Asajj Ventress turns out to be. Despite the difficulties she''s experienced, she remains a Force to be dealt with and an honorable, multi-faceted woman. With the Jedi Council making an ill fated decision, it... See more
Wow, what a ride. What a wonderfully, complex individual Asajj Ventress turns out to be. Despite the difficulties she''s experienced, she remains a Force to be dealt with and an honorable, multi-faceted woman. With the Jedi Council making an ill fated decision, it encompasses Ventress and a sunny Jedi named Quinlon Cos with possibilities, neither could imagine. They are well suited, his open honesty contrasting with her guarded nature. A wonderful love story with tragic consequences. Possesed of the rare gift of balance of the Force, able to use both sides without turning back into a Sith, Ventress finds redemption in Vos, while he falls to the Dark side. Christie Golden has crafted a thrilling adventure, touching love story and a cautionary tale of war''s consequences on good people. One of the finest Star Wars books I''ve ever read, I took my time to savor all the juicy details. I loved the story of the Nightsisters and the lesson for the Jedi to remain true to their ideals, less they go down the path of darkness. I''d really hoped they could''ve had a happy ending. Bittersweet and beautiful.
17 people found this helpful
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Jonathan Buchanan
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A dark, action-packed…love story
Reviewed in the United States on March 8, 2020
don’t usually go out of my way to read Star Wars books. I LOVE Star Wars, don’t get me wrong, but that doesn’t always translate to reading the written adventures. Only the movie novelizations and very few others (particularly Shadows of the Empire). However, my love for the... See more
don’t usually go out of my way to read Star Wars books. I LOVE Star Wars, don’t get me wrong, but that doesn’t always translate to reading the written adventures. Only the movie novelizations and very few others (particularly Shadows of the Empire). However, my love for the tv series The Clone Wars and knowledge that this novel adapts unproduced episodes made me decide to bite the bullet and get this book in Kindle and Audible formats.

To briefly describe the story without spoiling it, the Jedi Council decides that the Clone Wars have gone on long enough and that Count Dooku needs to be assassinated. Not “stopped”, not “brought in” to faced justice, but ASSASSINATED, something against the Jedi code. They assign Quinlan Vos, a wild card Jedi, to the task, instructing him to seek the assistance of someone who can help him – Asajj Ventress, former apprentice to Dooku and someone the Jedi don’t trust. They meet up and Asajj agrees to help. As they prepare, something stirs between them, a love that may be the mission’s undoing.

This was an awesome story. It takes its time to set everything up, knowing it doesn’t have to conform to Cartoon Network’s broadcast schedule (fun fact kiddies: Star Wars wasn’t ALWAYS owned by Disney :) ) as well as knowing it needs to show the reader what’s going on without the show’s animation department. It goes from action-packed to thoughtful without giving you whiplash and has great suspense. You know Count Dooku will survive (spoilers: Revenge of the Sith occurs after The Clone Wars), but you find yourself rooting for Quinlan to survive, as well as Asajj.

Which leads to one of the best aspects of this book: it’s a well told love story involving Asajj Ventress, one of the last characters you’d expect to be part of one. I only know Quinlan from the one episode of The Clone Wars he appeared in but the book managed to match the character from the show. More pleasantly, it also handled Asajj well, having her react to each of the book’s situations about how a viewer of the series would guess she would. The romance grows slowly, with the characters resisting for understandable reasons before surrendering when they become comfortable and vulnerable with each other. I think the “still a better love story the Twilight” meme is overdone (and I’ve never read Twilight, so I can’t fairly judge) but I’m willing to nominate Dark Disciple as one such story.

One reader, either here or elsewhere, complained that the book assumes the reader has seen The Clone Wars TV series. I’m sort of on both sides of the fence. The book does go over the backstories and any element the reader needs to understand the story and characters. That said, I would highly recommend you watch the first six seasons of The Clone Wars before reading this. The elements I mentioned a sentence ago are there but having watched the show definitely helps. Seeing the 121 episodes of the first six seasons helps you understand the Jedi stooping to assassination to end the war and also helps you connect with Asajj when you’ve seen what she went through previously. In addition, I feel that for Star Wars books, there is a high likelihood that previous media may or may not play a part in the current story. Finally, these were adapted from scripts for potential season seven-eight episodes and should be treated as such: just as you’d probably not start a TV series at the end of its run (unless you just happened to catch a later episode; I mean a concentrated, planned watching of a series), you’d probably enjoy this book more after watching the great Clone Wars series.

That does to lead to my one real complaint: you can certainly see the signs this was adapted from tv scripts. Past events from earlier in the book are brought fairly repeatedly, almost like they’re recapping parts of the story you watched a week ago on TV. I feel Christie Golden could’ve adapted those parts out to hide it’s TV origins but it’s not obtrusive and is possibly helpful to readers who can’t read it in a day or so. To be fair, this was a problem for The Clones Wars movie (four episodes edited into one film) and is even evident, albeit less so, when watching the show an episode or two a day, every day (don’t let that deter you though; still a great show :) )

As for the audiobook, Marc Thompson was excellent. While a few of his voices sounded off (his Mace Windu sounded like a southern general in a Civil War novel rather than the Samuel L Jackson-played Jedi general in a Clone Wars novel and his Anakin was iffy), most of them were great. He matched Quinlan Vos from the show but, more importantly to me, he nailed Asajj’s voice, very impressive since he’s a man voicing a woman and Asajj appeared in far more episodes than Quinlan. Also, with all due respect to Corey Burton and Tom Kane, his Count Dooku and Yoda were flawless just like theirs (and considering Christopher Lee was reported as being impressed with Corey Burton’s portrayal of Count Dooku, that’s another layer of compliment). He acted the heck out of the book’s scenes and only the TV series cast could’ve done better.

Finally, for those who haven’t listened to a Star Wars audiobook before, be prepared for to hear the iconic sound effects and music from the Star Wars films. Huge surprise and they went a long way making this feel like a Star Wars story. The only possible complaint against them (I know, “How can you have a problem with John Williams’ score included on anything?” :D) is that I feel Kevin Kiner’s score from The Clone Wars would’ve been a better fit for this series set during and adapted from the series about the Clone Wars. Otherwise, John Williams'' music is always a great treat.

This was a great Star Wars story and addition to The Clone Wars series. It’s just as exciting as any episode or movie and as heartfelt as any good romance. My only real complaint is that this would’ve been awesome animated. That said, you’ll be grateful a way was found to tell this story and full credit must be given to the series writers and Christie Golden. If you’re a fan of Star Wars in general, read this book. However, if you’ve seen and feel in love with The Clone Wars TV series, then DEFINITELY read this book. It’s a great addition to the series’ lore and great ending for one its most popular characters.
7 people found this helpful
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Anastasia
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good start, lousy finish. Unfortunate disappointment.
Reviewed in the United States on August 28, 2019
I was hoping that I''d really be able to enjoy this book because the two main characters are ones that I really enjoyed watching in their time on The Clone Wars. The book starts off brisk, exciting, and well-written; the characterization and chemistry is interesting, the... See more
I was hoping that I''d really be able to enjoy this book because the two main characters are ones that I really enjoyed watching in their time on The Clone Wars. The book starts off brisk, exciting, and well-written; the characterization and chemistry is interesting, the story and inherent conflict is compelling, and I am engaged. About midway through the novel, though, things begin to slow down.

Spoilers Ahead!

Quinlon Vos'' training by Ventress is a bit cumbersome; the chemistry that existed so naturally before seems now forced; as the story proceeds the passages become more overwrought, cumbersome, and boring. I was skimming pages waiting for something to catch my attention; a striking bit of prosework, some good dialog... but it just wasn''t there. I committed myself to finishing the book but started skimming pages once I was about 3/4ths of the way through. It just went ON and ON without anything to really grab you and get the interest going.

Then, at the end, the worst sin of all - Ventress gets fridged for Quinlon Vos''s manpain (because Star Wars really needed more of this). I was so frustrated and disappointed; I thought that Asajj deserved better than to get jerked around by a dude and then die for him in the end so he could ~truly experience love~ when in the end he goes back to the Jedi order and things go back to normal I guess? It was awful. I can''t even look at the book right now, I''m so mad.
6 people found this helpful
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Sebastian ZavalaTop Contributor: Star Wars
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Would''ve preferred to see the Clone Wars episodes
Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2017
Dark Disciple is based on unproduced episodes of the great TV Show The Clone Wars. On the one hand, most fans are (or should be) still quite sad that the series was cancelled, but on the other, it''s good to see some of this material still being produced, at least on another... See more
Dark Disciple is based on unproduced episodes of the great TV Show The Clone Wars. On the one hand, most fans are (or should be) still quite sad that the series was cancelled, but on the other, it''s good to see some of this material still being produced, at least on another medium.
Nevertheless, and despite some solid characterisation, Dark Disciple is not a particularly great novel. Yes, it''s entertaining and easily readable, but it never felt particularly memorable. The third act in particular feels too long and slow; I felt that the natural climax arrived 2/3 into the book, which means there''s a sort of epilogue that consumes 1/3 of the novel. Dark Disciple should''ve ended on an interesting, thrilling note; instead, I finished the book feeling it was a little too much.
This doesn''t mean Dark Disciple is a bad novel, though. It''s well-written and the central relationship between the unlikeliest of couples definitely works. It''s also pretty emotional from time to time. It does feel like a clunky adaptation of a story from another medium, though, and that''s its greatest flaw.
6 people found this helpful
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Kabfire22
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Start Wars novel. One of the better ones I''ve read in the Star Wars Universe.
Reviewed in the United States on December 26, 2020
I really enjoyed this book. I''ve seen all the movies, read several of the novels, and watched some of the shows so this was nice to fill in some back story on some of the more well known characters. I enjoyed this book more than some of the last few I''ve read. I have... See more
I really enjoyed this book. I''ve seen all the movies, read several of the novels, and watched some of the shows so this was nice to fill in some back story on some of the more well known characters. I enjoyed this book more than some of the last few I''ve read. I have bounced around the time-line with the stories I have read. I''ll tend to read the ones that interest me most or try and finish a particular series in the books. I liked this story and I''m looking to read more by Christie and realize that I bought some of hers years ago in paperback but have not read. I read the Kindle version and it says 319 pages, my kindle said 317 pages but when I stayed up until 02:30 to finish it I was only at 70% complete when it hit pg 317 and stayed at pg 317 until finished a couple days later. I knew really on the pages were not equaling the % finished but as I got around pg 300 the book was playing out like it could very well finish at 317. Other than that I thought it was well written and I would definitely recommend and read again one day.
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Pugzy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Who is the Dark disciple?
Reviewed in the United States on February 26, 2017
First I have to say that when it was announced that the original expanded universe was being scrapped I (like many others) was not too happy. After spending a lot of time and money on the novels comics etc. to have everything conveniently tossed aside to start over was a... See more
First I have to say that when it was announced that the original expanded universe was being scrapped I (like many others) was not too happy. After spending a lot of time and money on the novels comics etc. to have everything conveniently tossed aside to start over was a little disheartening. Then came the force awakens and well you know.... it turned out to be a good thing. All that being said lets get to the book itself.
Dark Disciple as it turns out is a pretty good read and stand alone book. If you read christie goldens other star wars novels omen, allies and ascension then your familiar with her style. She has an easy to read way about her that makes the books flow which is a good thing. The love story that develops between vos and ventress felt a little rushed to me, it could have been fleshed out just a little bit more, but perhaps that is just publishers keeping the book to under 400 pages.
The story follows Quinlan Vos as he is assigned a task by the jedi council to recruit Asajj Ventress to help kill count Dooku. I will not give away any spoilers here but an interesting observation of the book is how it brings out what can happen to people who are put into undercover high stress combat situations, things can get.... fuzzy. People who are exposed to that kind of stress for extended periods of time are changed and the book does touch on that..... in a star wars way. Example; the council gives vos the assignment and when he comes back they become afraid weary of him but they do try as best they can to help him, perhaps the author was trying to make a statement about vets who come home different and no one understands them except for those who went through the same thing. Just an observation.
If you are looking for a good star wars read then this is one you would want, it has plenty of action, a good story and it focuses on two characters that after this book will probably not get any more time spent on them. The development of both characters is better in the comics I feel but all of that is no longer cannon but if you take what was written in the comics, the clone wars show and this book then together you have a good grasp of two characters that will be missed.
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Anthony Avina
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the most complicated love stories ever told in the Star Wars universe!
Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2016
Star Wars: Dark Disciples by Christine Golden Book Review One of the most complicated love stories ever told in the Star Wars universe! Let me start off by stating the obvious: I''m a huge Star Wars fan. No, I can''t speak Wookie or list the entire... See more
Star Wars: Dark Disciples by Christine Golden Book Review

One of the most complicated love stories ever told in the Star Wars universe!

Let me start off by stating the obvious: I''m a huge Star Wars fan. No, I can''t speak Wookie or list the entire history of the Republic, but I do
love the story and the characters of the Star Wars universe started by George Lucas and curated by several writers and creators over the decades.
In Christine Golden''s novel Star Wars: Dark Disciple, fans are treated to an untold story from just before the end of the Clone Wars, when the
Jedi Order became desperate and turn to an unlikely ally for a mission to end the war. Here is the synopsis:

Based on unproduced scripts from the blockbuster TV show Star Wars: The Clone Wars!

The only way to bring down the dark side''s most dangerous warrior may be for Jedi and Sith to join forces.

In the war for control of the galaxy between the armies of the dark side and the Republic, former Jedi Master turned ruthless Sith Lord Count
Dooku has grown ever more brutal in his tactics. Despite the powers of the Jedi and the military prowess of their clone army, the sheer number
of fatalities is taking a terrible toll. And when Dooku orders the massacre of a flotilla of helpless refugees, the Jedi Council feels it has no
choice but to take drastic action: targeting the man responsible for so many war atrocities, Count Dooku himself.

But the ever-elusive Dooku is dangerous prey for even the most skilled hunter. So the Council makes the bold decision to bring both sides of the
Force''s power to bear—pairing brash Jedi Knight Quinlan Vos with infamous one-time Sith acolyte Asajj Ventress. Though Jedi distrust for the
cunning killer who once served at Dooku''s side still runs deep, Ventress''s hatred for her former master runs deeper. She''s more than willing to
lend her copious talents as a bounty hunter—and assassin—to Vos''s quest.

Together, Ventress and Vos are the best hope for eliminating Dooku—as long as the emerging feelings between them don''t compromise their mission.
But Ventress is determined to have her retribution and at last let go of her dark Sith past. Balancing the complicated emotions she feels for
Vos with the fury of her warrior''s spirit, she resolves to claim victory on all fronts—a vow that will be mercilessly tested by her deadly enemy
. . . and her own doubt.

The intimate and complicated love story of Ventress and Vos is something to behold. Both beheld to a sense of duty, (Vos to the Jedi, Ventress to
her revenge and mission to leave the dark side behind her), the novel does an excellent job of exploring the shades of grey that exist amongst
the Force users of the Star Wars universe. While for some it''s as simple as the light versus the dark side, there are others who see a chance to
explore the depths of both sides of the force. The ruthless nature of the Clone Wars and the way these two characters are tested between their
mission and their feelings for one another makes this a gripping tale that every Star Wars fan should read.

Overall, this is a fantastic novel. I love the chemistry between Voss and Ventris, and the way their story impacts major characters like Obi-Wan
and Anakin Skywalker. I especially loved getting to see more sides of Ventris, who has always been a complicated character in the mythology, from
a Sith assassin to a fallen Nightsister to a bounty hunter for hire. Author Christie Golden really has done a masterful job of bringing these
characters to life in a way where you feel emotionally connected to them, and this is a true testament to the power of the author''s writing. If
you haven''t yet, you should check out Star Wars: Dark Disciple by Christie Golden today!
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J. L. Carter
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five star read? Maybe...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 12, 2020
This is an enjoyable, easy read and one of the first Star Wars books to really grab me. I love the Character of Ventress, possibly she is one of my favourite characters from the whole Clone Wars saga, so find out where she ended up was both a joy and a heartbreak. All the...See more
This is an enjoyable, easy read and one of the first Star Wars books to really grab me. I love the Character of Ventress, possibly she is one of my favourite characters from the whole Clone Wars saga, so find out where she ended up was both a joy and a heartbreak. All the way through I was hoping for a happier ending for her, despite knowing that with order 66 just around the corner, everyone would be killed anyway. The aspects of the novel dealing with Dooku bordered on the tedious, after all they could not kill him because he is killed in Episode Three. However, following Ventress as she finds her humanity was beautifully written, without the cheesiness of her becoming a Jedi again. It was a fitting end for a fabulous character and I really enjoyed it, to the point that some scenes actually made me cry! Like I said, I really enjoyed this book and not just because it was about one of my favourite characters.
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Tracy Aitken
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mistress of the Force (more like)
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 30, 2019
I thought that Ventress was one of the strongest characters in Star Wars The Clone Wars. Strong, fearless and fantastic, trained by Count Dooku but born a Night Sister; a female born into an all female society totally independent of men. Don’t get me wrong - Ventress isn’t...See more
I thought that Ventress was one of the strongest characters in Star Wars The Clone Wars. Strong, fearless and fantastic, trained by Count Dooku but born a Night Sister; a female born into an all female society totally independent of men. Don’t get me wrong - Ventress isn’t gay or presented as such but what made her such a liberating character was her freedom from the constraints of romance or lurrrve. Here however she falls for some funky Jedi and sacrifices herself to let him live. She saves him from the abyss of The Dark Side. Blah blah. Not my cup of tea but if you do like this sort of thing mixed with the living Force, knock yourself out.
3 people found this helpful
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Richard Wright
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Surprisingly murky
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 31, 2017
Based on scripts for an unproduced sequence of episodes for the cancelled Clone Wars cartoon series (a far more satisfying and complex prequel to the original movies than the second trilogy managed to be), this novel follows a Jedi called Quinlan Vos as he works with former...See more
Based on scripts for an unproduced sequence of episodes for the cancelled Clone Wars cartoon series (a far more satisfying and complex prequel to the original movies than the second trilogy managed to be), this novel follows a Jedi called Quinlan Vos as he works with former Sith Asaaj Ventress to assassinate the leader of the armies waging war on the Galactic Republic. Given that the novel is still rooted to what was basically a kid’s show, it’s a surprisingly dark story about the moments when noble intentions (ending a war) morph into unconscionable actions (assassination/murder). It’s also fast-paced, as you’d expect from a Star Wars story, with plenty of fan-service along the way - particularly if you know these unresolved characters from the show. The benefit of using characters who don’t turn up in later movies is that there is no safety net for them. Unlike Anakin, who can’t fall to the dark side yet because he’s due to do that in a movie further down the timeline, Quinlan’s fate is not a given. Unlike Obi-Wan, who can’t die yet because he’s not old enough to be Alec Guinness, Ventress isn’t even a footnote in the original trilogy. This gives the author a freedom not often found in tie-in fiction to pursue the choices of the characters to whatever ends she pleases, and this she does. Basically, if you like Star Wars, then despite outstaying its welcome by a false ending or two, this is a fun and surprising read.
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Zack
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An incredible take on Quinlan Vos and Asajj Ventress!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 23, 2020
This novel from Christie Golden was everything I hoped it would be and more. As a huge fan of the TV series Star Wars: The Clone Wars, I picked up this book after hearing it was adapted from unused scripts for the show''s planned sixth season prior to its cancellation in...See more
This novel from Christie Golden was everything I hoped it would be and more. As a huge fan of the TV series Star Wars: The Clone Wars, I picked up this book after hearing it was adapted from unused scripts for the show''s planned sixth season prior to its cancellation in 2013. The story reads with the exact same excitement as the series, and is driven by equally strong character work and plot. One thing that really surprised me throughout this novel was the absolutely spot-on characterisations of already well-known characters. From the expertly handled smaller appearances of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker, to the perfect way in which Golden captures Asajj Ventress and Quinlan Vos in their leading roles, Dark Disciple stays incredibly true to the Star Wars franchise and further cements the novel''s two protagonists as two of the most interesting characters that Star Wars has to offer. Golden also explores the dark side of the Force and the grey morality of the Clone Wars better than any other piece of Star Wars media I have seen so far. It is certainly a must-read for Star Wars fans.
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Matt
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A bit too much crammed in
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 15, 2017
This novel is based on what presumably would have been the remainder of Season Six of the Clone Wars animated series, following the ''Lost Episodes''. It''s a shame we never got to see them as originally intended, but Christie Golden has done a decent job of turning the...See more
This novel is based on what presumably would have been the remainder of Season Six of the Clone Wars animated series, following the ''Lost Episodes''. It''s a shame we never got to see them as originally intended, but Christie Golden has done a decent job of turning the scripts into a novel. In it, we find unorthodox Jedi Quinlan Vos teamed up with former Sith Asajj Ventress to take down Count Dooku - however, not only do the two find themselves attracted to each other but, as Ventress seems to be moving more towards the Light side of the Force, Vos begins to descend towards the Dark. These are two of the more interesting characters from the Clone Wars era, and the book provides a suitable, rather tragic resolution to their character arcs. The main problem is that the story has been condensed from EIGHT episode scripts, meaning that it often rushes on at a breakneck pace without time for the events to have any impact on the reader. I also felt a few of the characters'' actions were either unclear, muddled or just unconvincing. Nevertheless, if you enjoyed the series, you''ll want to see how it would''ve continued / concluded. A worthwhile read but not one of the best examples of SW fiction.
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